Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
john@AEC

sodium hypochlorite & surfactants

Recommended Posts

G'day

I've been concerned, as many of you have, about how well surfactants mix with sodium hypochlorite, so, after putting my clever cap on, I searched for "surfactant" & "hypochlorite".

In amongst everything else where products from

* Dow Chemicals

* Mason Surfactants

and a few others.

Does anyone have experience using these specific surfactants?

Does anyone know of off the shelf products that contain this type of surfactant?

Thanks

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know alot about it - I use a non-ionic surfactant called NP-9 Tergitol {nonylphenol} that purposely is made to work with bleach. I use it along with TSP in the bleach for my housewashes. And only 0.6% makes it onto the home after downstreaming - and it knocks all mildew off like gangbusters! This is in stark contrast to the other guys here who insist on 12% bleach with 1%-2% making it onto the side of a home after downstreaming.

-Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plainpainter. I see that Tergitol is about 19 bucks for 100ml. How much do you add per gallon of house wash? As a surfacant do you notice that the bleach/houseclean mix holds on or sheets better than not using it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keth - you can get tergitol much much cheaper than that at thechemistrystore.com. As with how it works, yes it makes the stuff hold much better on the sides of a house - but even on flat sections, it has this amazing ability to remove the need for brushing. If you use it with just bleach, ok - or just use bleach with TSP - again ok. But bleach with tsp and tergitol - man oh man.

-Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Plainpainter for the info. I will give it a try.

Do you ever find that the TSP leaves white residue on the windows even with thorough rinsing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never found that tsp leaves a white residue - on the sides of boxes they commonly tell you to put 1 quart of bleach and 1 cup of tsp to 3 quarts of water. I think that's just plain crazy - I have always just put 1/4 of tsp to one gallon of water then added a quart of bleach for 5 quarts total. That's been my mainstay, and where I start from when I want to tackle something. By adding 1/16 cup of tergitol to that gallon, has allowed me to cut down the bleach to one pint. And so now I have a mixture that I can put a siphon directly into a 6% bleach bottle with my added ingredients through my downstreamer which is 10:1. I was pressure washing a house, and it even knocked off the failing poly coating on the guy's front threshold!

But back to your question - never noticed any residue on windows, I don't think the nonylphenol would allow it - and I haven't killed any vegetation, just rinse the vegetation before and after.

-Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dan for the tip on Tergitol, as rinsing, especially windows, is my biggest drama/time waister.

Does the TSP affect aluminium? as most homes out my way have aluminium window frames (some are powder coated, but many are plain).

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have never found that tsp leaves a white residue - on the sides of boxes they commonly tell you to put 1 quart of bleach and 1 cup of tsp to 3 quarts of water. I think that's just plain crazy - I have always just put 1/4 of tsp to one gallon of water then added a quart of bleach for 5 quarts total. That's been my mainstay, and where I start from when I want to tackle something. By adding 1/16 cup of tergitol to that gallon, has allowed me to cut down the bleach to one pint. And so now I have a mixture that I can put a siphon directly into a 6% bleach bottle with my added ingredients through my downstreamer which is 10:1. I was pressure washing a house, and it even knocked off the failing poly coating on the guy's front threshold!

But back to your question - never noticed any residue on windows, I don't think the nonylphenol would allow it - and I haven't killed any vegetation, just rinse the vegetation before and after.

-Dan

Hey Dan, you're knowledge of chemistry is impressive. When are you going to upgrade your equipment to match your chemicals? It's painful to read you are still using a PITA, POS 5Hp 2.5 gpm machine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the percentage of nonylphenol in the Tergitol or is the latter just a trade name for the nonylphenol? Just curious as the surfactant manufacturer that I work for has several thousand gallons of it in totes and tanks.

Thanks,

Anthony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/21/2006 at 7:22 AM, plainpainter said:

I have never found that tsp leaves a white residue - on the sides of boxes they commonly tell you to put 1 quart of bleach and 1 cup of tsp to 3 quarts of water. I think that's just plain crazy - I have always just put 1/4 of tsp to one gallon of water then added a quart of bleach for 5 quarts total. That's been my mainstay, and where I start from when I want to tackle something. By adding 1/16 cup of tergitol to that gallon, has allowed me to cut down the bleach to one pint. And so now I have a mixture that I can put a siphon directly into a 6% bleach bottle with my added ingredients through my downstreamer which is 10:1. I was pressure washing a house, and it even knocked off the failing poly coating on the guy's front threshold!

But back to your question - never noticed any residue on windows, I don't think the nonylphenol would allow it - and I haven't killed any vegetation, just rinse the vegetation before and after.

-Dan

Do you still use these chemicals

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×