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      The Grime Scene Terms Of Service and Forum Rules   08/23/2007

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  1. Last week
  2. Glad to know we could be of help. Enjoy your deck and pool! Rod & Beth
  3. I'm sure we will. I know the kids will love the fact that I'll have a safe place to sit when I'm too cold to go in the pool but they're not. Right now the rule is either me or my husband has to be IN the pool with them because the pool wall is 54 inches and I can't see over the side from our sitting area. Let alone scramble into it if something were to happen. If only one of us is in and has to get out, we make them all get out. We are starting to trust the 14 year old more, but only for a minute and not if we have to go in the house. When he was in kindergarten one of his classmates died in a pool at a BBQ a couple weeks after school let out. I was always hyper vigilant about the water (more than my husband) but that shook the whole town. Then our darling youngest, when he was 2, shimmied up the ladder with the roll down safety cover locked down and plopped right into the pool. He was no longer allowed in the yard without a vest on. But I think it scared him, he's 6 now and he still waits by the chairs for me to go in first. I've been reading through a lot of the threads on here and I think we're going to use the Armstrong Clark. Hopefully we can find it here. The Cutek my father in law told us to get must be a phantom one. We did pick up the end sealer. This forum is very helpful.
  4. Either way, I'm sure you will enjoy it. As a contractor myself, there are things that I just don't have time for in my own back yard and have had to hire someone to help. Using a pressure washer is not about the pressure. It is about the technique and method. We don't use High pressure on wood. The cleaners do the work and the pressure washer serves as the speed rinse tool to help facilitate faster and more effective cleaning. It is when one leaves out the cleaners that the pressure washer is left to it's intent to clean with. Pressure. It is not really clean either. It may remove most of the superficial dirt but there is remnants that remain or can regrow if not removed or properly addressed. Rod & Beth
  5. Earlier
  6. Or you could see me back looking for a contractor to do it for us. Lol
  7. I'm hoping if it's done every year the "cleaning" part is easier, making the entire job faster. I doubt I'll use a pressure washer (we have one) I'm too afraid of damaging the wood, but with two of us, it shouldn't be too bad. Like when we open and close the pool. The trick is convincing the husband that it "has" to be done that way. Haha
  8. Doing it every year is ambitious. I know from dealing with my own deck but I wish you the best in making your new pool deck a wonderful place for your family to have fun. Rod & Beth
  9. Rod & Beth, Thank you very much. I know a lot of the stains/sealers "advertise" that they can last several years, but to me it's just worth it to redo every year especially since we have so much less to do without the railings. In all the research and reading I've been doing, you are the first to mention end grain sealer. I've never heard of that before. I really appreciate the help. RC
  10. Considering maintenance is the first topic in choice of not only the wood but a sealer either clear or with a stain/tint is important. Considering a budget and the likelihood that the pool will be in a sunny area, Pressure treated wood is the least expensive option. Look for it to need replacement in about 15 years or so. Sealing with either of the options is acceptable as long as you go forth with the understanding that when cleaning is performed, there is likely to be wash debris sprayed into that pool. The deck should be dry by the time you seal it correct but should be done within two weeks of installation. Also, the end cuts of the boards need to be sealed with an End Grain Sealer to help with longevity, and natural moisture loss which will happen in these situations. As far as oil vs acrylic or any hybrid formulation, I would stay away from acrylics which do not perform well when exposed to bleach and can lead to the wood turning black due to a chemical reaction with the formulation in the wood. Oil based products will weather better and be easier to maintain. Rod & Beth
  11. Hi everyone, I stumbled onto this forum while I was searching for information on stains and sealers for a deck we're having put on our above ground pool. The pool has been up for 4 years and we've been saving to get it done right. Unfortunately, me being out of work took a chunk out of that savings. Without writing a novel, we decided to still move forward and get it done with pressure treated wood instead of TREX. I'm getting overwhelmed trying to figure out when we stain, if we stain or just use sealer, oil vs. water based.... the list goes on. I thought I had it all figured out and narrowed down to Woodrich or Ready Seal then I read a post on here that if the deck is near water or a pool you would use different products. I give up. Please help me. The contractor is coming again on Friday to take final measurements and go over exactly where on the pool we want the deck. The railings and spindles according to the written quote are vinyl w/black spindles. So I'm guessing we only have to worry about the steps and main deck. Is it safe to use the pool/deck? I read that the wood shouldn't be stained/sealed for a few months? Which stain do you recommend for these conditions (we're in NJ, close to Philadelphia)? We do want a transparent/semi-transparent one. Does the type of wood matter? Thank you ALL for your time and I hope everyone's business has survived this and is on it's way back to success. I'll be honest, one of the reasons we didn't try to tackle this ourselves is that after seeing so many of our friends struggling and some even losing their business, we wanted to do it this way. But the finishing we can definitely do. Best to you all. RC
  12. Looking For Cleaning Leading

    Is Ak company offer maid services also? Actually my friend is looking to have one so need suggestions for companies that offer such services.
  13. GPM & PSI

    The best advice I can give is to look into vinyl siding manufacturers on the subjects of: Installation, maintenance and recommended cleaners for the types of siding installed. Aside from vinyl, there is aluminum, composites such as Hardiplank and cementatious coatings such as E.I.F.S. (Exterior Insulatative Finish System) or brand names such as Dryvit and common other versions called Stucco. There is much to learn in regard to washing houses and learning about their construction including familiarization with IRC residential and local codes helps one to become a better cleaner and less of a creator of damage or liability. We only use low pressure from two options. One is an M-5 Jet which is for application of the cleaners. The other is a rinse tip and at times a shooter tip which is a 0° tip with a larger orifice to help throw water up high. Pressure never really exceeds 60-100 psi given the range from tip to surface. Rod & Beth
  14. GPM & PSI

    Okay that makes sense. I planned on using a buffer tank regardless for either. maybe 65 or 100 gal I’m not sure yet depending on what I find locally, for the bypass system and to ensure I get proper GPM in case if the customer has low GPM from the spigot. In theory, where the siding overlaps, what if I were to just agitate with a brush and cleaner and use low PSI To rinse? To ensure no water seeps behind the siding? I don’t know if that makes sense i am just trying to make this work as efficiently as possible ya know? I’m sure there are precautionary steps to take to prevent that? Thank you for your time I really appreciate it
  15. GPM & PSI

    It is unfortunate that you have that allergy so in terms of what you are asking, there comes another aspect you need to be aware of. Pressure on siding forces water behind it. That is bad. The siding is a system of J channels that overlap and have no ability to keep water out when it is forced up under each clap board lap of siding. This is why we use chemicals to do the work and prefer soft washing in order to limit the liability created by pushing water behind the siding where it can get to the sheathing which is mostly particle board or plywood. Yes, there is a moisture barrier wrap installed but the one thing I have found is it is not consistent. Many contractors installing tyvek or whatever name brand house wrap before siding goes on actually skip the upper floors and gables and in some cases the whole house if the inspector is not due to be back before they can make up for lost time due to weather. Bleach is a part of the solution we use. There is a number of other ingredients involved to help clean. Just like doing dishes and laundry, there are cleaners for specific stains and clothing types. This plays into our field in that we largely only focus on removing mold, mildew and algae which are the common conditions house siding incurs. There is a detergent, a degreaser, a foaming agent and a rinse aid. Each plays a part in the cleaning process and most of all helps to ensure that not only is the siding clean, no bleach is left behind to be reactivated upon any subsequent moisture event. Now, in answering your question about GPM vs PSI, there is a rule of thumb. GPM helps to rinse and wash faster because you are using more water to do the job. PSI is used to address issues that require pressure to remove. In the instances of what you are planning to do, psi will play little in that role. But! Before you jump to higher gpm, you will have to ask one question: What are the supply capabilities of the residents flow? There are some out there that have flow restrictors which won't feed your machine the gpm it requires. The other option is to have a buffer tank that you can arrive with and fill while applying chems to get ahead of that. Some use trailer configurations (personally I hate them due to neighborhood road/parking conditions which don't allow much room to navigate. Others use a van with a weight capability to support the large load of a tank. A gallon of water weighs 8 pounds so multiply that times the tanks capacity and compare to the cargo capacity and let that guide you. I have two versions we use since we do commercial in addition to residential which is our primary focus. A sprinter van which has a 200 gal tank and a chevy 2500 which only has a 30gal tank. Each serves a purpose accordingly and both are 3500psi 4gpm+ units by Hydrotek. We also have a simple drag around unit which is a 4000psi, 4gpm unit to supplement when we need additional guns on the task. The correct soaps and in many cases bleach will be required to address the many conditions you will encounter. To avoid the issues of allergic reactions, not only for yourself but any employees as well: PPE (Personal Protection Equipment). Rain gear, gloves (Determine which you have no allergies to. We use Nitrile) and rubber boots to keep your feet dry. The other item which will help as well is a face shield. These are costly but less so in the long run considering the medical outlays or time lost. Let me know if you have any questions. Rod & Beth
  16. GPM & PSI

    Okay this is going to be an odd one. So, I’m relatively new to the pressure washing industry but have a decent entry level knowledge about most things pressure washing related. Until I started researching on the internet about pressure washing i honestly never realized how essential bleach (or SH whatever you prefer to say) is to a large percentage of pressure washing businesses. Here’s the catch, I’m actually allergic to bleach.. My parents found out when I was a kid because I started breaking out in hives and had other allergic reactions when in contact with bleach in anyway. Which is obviously unfortunate because I understand how much more timely efficient using bleach is versus just pressure from a pressure washer. I want to still continue my pressure washing business because i genuinely enjoy the work. I am just am going to have a take a different chemical approach that works for me. My question is, if I am relying more on the power washer rather than chemicals to wash a house should I still more concerned about GPM or PSI? I’ve heard many times GPM is king but isn’t that more for the rinsing and applying chemical aspect of it? Maybe not. But I’ve been stuck on this decision. I am looking at two machines. One is 4GPM 4000 psi, and the other is 5.5GPM 3000 psi. Which would be better for residential use only when using only the power washer and soap? I will be doing siding, decks, fences, driveways, sidewalks, but no roofs. Which do you guys think will get the job done faster in my situation? More PSI or more GPM? Thank you
  17. The product he is using is Oxalic acid and is common for cleaning before application of a stain. It does not have stripping capabilities and should not be a problem as long as the contractor attends anything that gets on it to avoid any whitish remnants on the surface. Oxalic acid is white when it dries. The 'Deck Wash' product is bleach which is the part that needs the Revive to neutralize after the wash is complete. This product may discolor the stain on the neighbors side. Either way, the contractor will need access to the neighbors side to attend it properly after washing AND staining to ensure there are no issues. Unless the stain product is designed to be applied on wet wood, not allowing the wood to properly dry is not the way to do it. Find another contractor. Rod & Beth
  18. I have a cedar fence that was installed 1 year ago. I wasn't able to get it stained last year. It is on the borderline of starting to turn a little gray in parts. I am talking to a fence staining contractor about staining it now. He is suggesting that he use Sherwin Williams SuperDeck Revive to clean the gray off before applying the stain. He told me he can do the cleaning during the same trip as the stain. He says that it's not a problem to have the wood wet from hosing off the Revive when he puts on the stain. The stain instructions say that the wood needs to be dry. I realize that "time is money" and he wants to be price competitive. My questions are these: 1. Will his method give me a good and lasting result? 2. The Revive product info says it needs to be neutralized with the Sherwin Williams Deck Wash but he will just be using water to wash it off. Is that a problem? 3. The neighbor behind me has stained his side of the fence. Will the SuperDeck Revive product damage my neighbor's stain job? Thanks for your help.
  19. COVID-19 Pandemic

    Make a good year of it! Rod & Beth
  20. COVID-19 Pandemic

    Yeah, My updated info. from the Gov't is that we will be able to start on the 19th. This is one of those times when having Toronto right next door is a hindrance, The more rural areas could open but Toronto is so dense it makes it more problematic. dense def. 1) highly populated 2) thick headed both apply. OK kids. Stay safe and have fun.
  21. COVID-19 Pandemic

    I hear ya. We are beginning next week on the 11th. Given our season is finite and ends late november, I feel much of this year is going to be diminished and our biggest concern is people dropping off due to financial reasons. Rod & Beth
  22. COVID-19 Pandemic

    I slowed down quite a bit in March & April but starting to pick back up now ? Hopefully we all will get back close to normal but my expectations of that happening this year are low?
  23. COVID-19 Pandemic

    We're hoping the first week of May but we'll see. In Maryland, this is a hub of major infrastructure and as a result have not reached that plateau. Rod & Beth
  24. COVID-19 Pandemic

    yup. Still stopped here. Probably until mid may till uncle Doug lets us go back. We got a real problem here with long term care, and its getting worse. Stay the course. Be well all.
  25. COVID-19 Pandemic

    Been on pause since late march. Rod & Beth
  26. COVID-19 Pandemic

    So how is everyone's pressure washing business doing during this pandemic ?
  27. Yeah, He will need to wash again before the recoat. That white dusty residue is the acrylic broken down by the rain. You must wash or it will plug up the pores and prevent good adhesion. Also, the acrylic " swells" when it gets wet even if it looks ok after it drys out you will have lost most of the stick. your saving grace is that this is an older deck, newer boards will completely fail in a couple months, but a recoat on these older more porous boards will likely hold up. After a proper wash with perc. Stay safe and have fun.
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